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Ocular System

Posner-Schlossman syndrome (PSS)

Posner-Schlossman syndrome (PSS), also known as glaucomatocyclitic crisis is a rare, typically unilateral and recurrent inflammatory ocular hypertensive disease characterized by a decrease in vision, elevated IOP, open anterior chamber angles, and normal visual fields and optic nerve appearance

Posner-Schlossman syndrome (PSS), also known as glaucomatocyclitic crisis is a rare, typically unilateral and recurrent inflammatory ocular hypertensive disease characterized by a decrease in vision, elevated IOP, open anterior chamber angles, and normal visual fields and optic nerve appearance

  • Secondary inflammatory glaucoma
Photograph of the anterior segment of the right eye (September 2004), showing a few central keratic precipitates visible centrally. There is no significant oedema. IOP was 42 mmHg. (Medical Photographic Imaging Centre RVEEH) | Green, R.J. (2007), Posner‐Schlossman syndrome (glaucomatocyclitic crisis). Clinical and Experimental Optometry, 90: 53-56. doi:10.1111/j.1444-0938.2006.00088.x

History:

In 1948, Posner and Schlossman first reported glaucomatocyclitic crisis, an uncommon form of glaucoma characterized by recurrent unilateral episodes of markedly elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) with mild idiopathic anterior chamber inflammation.


Etiology

Associated organisms:

Cause acute trabeculitis
  • Herpes simplex virus (HSV)
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV)

Clinical features

  • Unilateral blurred vision or halos (associated with corneal edema caused by an elevated IOP)
  • Mild eye discomfort/pain

Diagnosis

Characterized by a decrease in vision, elevated IOP, open anterior chamber angles, and normal visual fields and optic nerve appearance.


Management

Treatment centers on decreasing the IOP and inflammation.

  • Topical steroids (control inflammation)
  • Aqueous suppressants (reduce IOP)
  • Topical/oral NSAIDs
  • Antiglaucoma medications

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